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Terminology and Definitions

Here are some of the terms that could come up while reading contents of our website. Of course, if you have any other questions about some phrases that you did not quite understand, you can contact us at any time and we will be glad to help you out.


  1. Alternator The important piece of electrical kit that charges the battery. Always visible at the front of the engine compartment.

  2. Automotive Lighting The lighting system of a motor vehicle consists of lighting and signalling devices mounted or integrated to the front, sides, rear, and in some cases the top of the motor vehicle. The purpose of this system is to provide illumination for the driver to operate the vehicle safely after dark, to increase the conspicuity of the vehicle, and to display information about the vehicle's presence, position, size, direction of travel, and driver's intentions regarding direction and speed of travel

  3. Blind Spot The typical blind spot for a driver is behind the left shoulder.  If you are parked on the left hand side of the road and pulling back into the right hand lane then your blind spot will be over your right shoulder. Truck drivers have quite a sizable blind spot so be very careful when overtaking a truck to get out of the blind spot quickly in case the driver is thinking of changing lanes or overtaking a slower vehicle ahead of him.

  4. Brake Pads Convert the kinetic energy of the car to thermal energy by friction. Two brake pads are contained in the brake caliper with their friction surfaces facing the rotor.[1] When the brakes are hydraulically applied, the caliper clamps or squeezes the two pads together into the spinning rotor to slow/stop the vehicle.

  5. Braking Distance Distance a vehicle will travel from the point where its brakes are fully applied to when it comes to a complete stop.

  6. Coolant The chemical fluid used in the cooling system. Water on its own is not used in any cars today .This is usually replaced very two years.

  7. Defensive Driving Driving to save lives, time, and money, in spite of the conditions around you and the actions of others.

  8. Dipstick The device used for checking the oil level in every car. Not always easy to spot unless the particular manufacturer has taken the trouble to color-code the important pieces of equipment.

  9. Door-to-Door Takes place when the instructor picks you up at the start of the lessons and then drops you off at the end of the lesson at a location of your choice.

  10. Driver License A driver's license/licence is an official document which states that a person may operate a motorized vehicle, such as a motorcycle, car, truck or a bus, on a public roadway. As most US and Canadian citizens of driving age have a driver's license, it has become the de facto form of picture identification in those two countries. The laws relating to driver's licensing vary between jurisdictions. In some jurisdictions, a driver's license is issued after the recipient has passed a driving test, while in others, a person acquires a licence before beginning to drive.

  11. Driver training Term that has been used interchangeably with Driver's Ed. However, in states (eg, California) where online education is utilized, Driver Training specifically refers to the practical, or what is know as "behind the wheel" lessons. In states that still require classroom education, the term is still used interchangeably with Driver's Ed.

  12. Driving Lessons Independent learning events where a novice driver is taught how to drive an automobile. Typically, these are progressive in nature and include both the theory (classroom or online) and practical (behind the wheel) training of a novice driver.

  13. Driving School Company that employs professional driving instructors and has the expertise to train novice drivers on driving an automobile. Some modern driving schools actually develop their own programs based on research from leading universities.

  14. Dual Controls A system that allows the driving instructor, sitting in the front passenger seat to take control of the brake and accelerator.

  15. DUI Also known as Driving Under Influence, or driving while intoxicated (DWI), is the act of driving a motor vehicle with blood levels of alcohol in excess of specified limits.  This is considered a criminal offense in United States.  Convictions do not necessarily involve driving of a vehicle.  There is no need to prove impairment as long as the limit of blood level is exceeded.

  16. Learner Permit A driver's permit, learner's permit or learner's license, is a restricted license that is given to a person who is learning to drive, but has not yet satisfied the requirements to obtain a driver's license. Having a driver's permit for a certain length of time is usually one of the requirements (along with driver's education and a road test) for applying for a full driver's license. To get a learner's permit, one must typically pass a written test about rules of the road, although the process varies between jurisdictions.

  17. Motor Vehicle Vehicle whose propulsion is provided by an engine or motor such as an internal combustion engine, electric motor, combination of the two - hybrid electric vehicle, or some other method.

  18. Parallel Parking Parallel parking is a method of parking a vehicle in line with other parked cars. Cars parked in parallel are in one line, parallel to the curb, with the front bumper of each car facing the back bumper of the adjacent one. Parallel parking requires initially driving the car in reverse gear into the parking space.

  19. Refresher Lessons Lessons for qualified drivers who haven't driven for a period of time and need to brush-up on their skills or need a little extra confidence.

  20. Road Rage Aggressive or angry behavior by a driver of an automobile. Such behavior might include rude gestures, verbal insults, deliberately driving in an unsafe or threatening manner, or making threats.

  21. Road Test A driving test (also known as a driving exam) is a procedure designed to test a person's ability to drive a motor vehicle. It exists in various forms worldwide, and is often a requirement to pass the exam to obtain a driver's license. A driving test generally consists of one or two parts; the practical test, called a road test, used to assess a person's driving ability under normal operating conditions, and a written or oral test (theory test) to confirm a person's knowledge of driving and relevant rules and laws.

  22. Road Traffic Control Involves directing vehicular and pedestrian traffic around a construction zone, accident or other road disruption, thus ensuring the safety of emergency response teams, construction workers and the general public.

  23. Road-Traffic Safety Indication of how safe individual users are on some particular road, or on the roads belonging to some region. The main danger to road users is the likelihood of a traffic collision.

  24. Skid Steer A skid steer is a vehicle maneuvered by skid steering, a method of steering through braking or engaging tracks or wheels on one side of a vehicle. The skid steering vehicle is turned by generating differential velocity at the opposite sides of the vehicle, as the wheels or tracks are non-steerable (fixed position).

  25. Speed Limit Road speed limits are used in most countries to regulate the speed of road vehicles. Speed limits may define maximum (which may be variable), minimum or no speed limit and are normally indicated using a traffic sign. Speed limits are commonly set by the legislative bodies of nations or provincial governments and enforced by national or regional police and / or judicial bodies.

  26. Tailgating Practice of driving on a road too close to the vehicle in front, at a distance which does not guarantee that stopping to avoid collision is possible. Approximately one third of rear-end collisions involve tailgating.

  27. Traffic Collision Occurs when a vehicle collides with another vehicle, pedestrian, animal, road debris, or other stationary obstruction, such as a tree or utility pole. Traffic collisions may result in injury, death and property damage.

  28. Traffic Congestion Condition on road networks that occurs as use increases, and is characterized by slower speeds, longer trip times, and increased vehicular queueing. The most common example is the physical use of roads by vehicles.

  29. Traffic Light Signalling devices positioned at road intersections, pedestrian crossings and other locations to control competing flows of traffic.

  30. Two Second Rule Rule of thumb by which a driver may maintain a safe following distance at any speed. The driver should ideally stay at least two seconds behind any vehicle that is directly in front of the driver's vehicle.